Friday, July 24, 2015

Federal funding to fast-forward Green Line to LRT


In a historic move, the federal government has announced 1.5 billion dollars from the Public Transit Fund will be awarded to the Green Line project. This is the single largest infrastructure investment in Alberta’s history. 

What does this mean for Calgarians? 

The Green Line was initially planned to be constructed over 30+ years, starting as a bus-only Transitway, and later converting to LRT. This announcement from the Federal Government means that Calgarians in the north and southeast areas of the city will be able to enjoy faster, more reliable, light rail service ahead of schedule. Currently, 290,000 Calgarians are estimated to live along the Green Line corridor, with thousands more working and visiting the newly developing employment hubs and community activity centres on the route.  The Green Line will not only bring transit into communities, but will connect neighbourhoods where Calgarians can live, work and play close to transit.

Changing the face of Calgary’s LRT network

The Green Line will add an additional 40 kilometres of track to the existing 59 kilometre LRT network. End-to-end, the route will connect North Pointe and Seton to downtown.

Modeled after the existing CTrain system, which is 100 per cent powered by renewable wind energy, the Green Line will be an environmentally sustainable addition to the city’s transit service.

Today, Calgary’s population is 1.19 million and will increase to about 1.89 million in the next 30 years.  It is estimated that the Green Line will service 41 million passengers annually.

Fun Facts:
  • The Green Line will use low-floor trains which have similar capacity to current CTrains (780 passengers/3 car train), and carry over 8 times the number of passengers of an articulated bus. 
  • Ride times will be cut in half on the southeast leg of the Green Line with the completion of LRT; current ride times are clocked at about 69 minutes to the downtown core from the southeast; this will be reduced to about 35 minutes.
  • Calgary has the first wind-powered light rail transit system in North America and reduced CO2 emissions by over 56,000 tonnes in 2012.
  • 290,000 Calgarians are estimated to live along the Green Line corridor (including the Centre City and Beltline), estimated to increase to 465,000 by 2043.
  • Total city population is 1.19 million today, increasing to 1.89 million by 2043.
The Green Line will serve a number of community and business hubs in the city:

  • Community Activity Centres
    • Country Hills – 2,900 jobs
    • Quarry Park – 8,300 jobs
    • South Hill – 6,000 jobs
  • Major Activity Centres
    • Keystone Hills – 3,500 jobs
    • Seton – 5,200 jobs 
  • Industrial  Centres
    • Aurora – 6,700 jobs
    • Douglasglen Business Centre – 2,000 jobs
    • Glenmore/Barlow Business Centre – 4,900 jobs 
View the media announcement, July 24, 2015:

41 comments:

  1. I hope you will resolve the problem of over crowded train at peak time.

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  2. ^ The increase from 3 to 4 LRT carts to be rolled out this December should alleviate some pressures of crowded trains during peak periods.

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  3. Hopefully they complete the south leg first and go straight to LRT! Already 2 lines to the north, SE is in desperate need!

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    1. Already 2 lines to the South, North Central is in desperate need!

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    2. I don't really count the one that is to the West. Making that a priority was ridiculous in itself, the ridership from that are is almost non-existant! There is absolutely nothing in the SE.

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    3. Hopefully the construction begins with the south leg first and go straight to LRT, and extend to SETON station! There has been tons of new communities built, and residency needs faster LRT system to downtown every day!

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  4. So when you say low floor trains, will a different car be used on the green line from the other two lines, or are all c-train cars technically low floor?

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    1. Different than other lines. Google "low floor LRT" and look at images to see what they'll look like.

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    2. Will low floors work in calgary? We have snow here 6 months a year.

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    3. Let's get these new legs aligned so they are not at street level. Take a trip to Vancouver.

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    4. Good question. The low-floor trains will be different from the CTrains we currently have in Calgary. The Green Line will have smaller-scale stations that will be integrated into the neighbourhoods along the line. The platforms will be slightly raised curbs, rather than the 1 metre high platforms we have today. Low floor trains will allow for level boarding, meaning that people will be able to walk directly from a sidewalk and onto a train. They also offer better accessibility for people with disabilities.

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    5. Think "long tram" rather than C-Train.

      http://www.raillynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Vienna-light-rail-facility.jpg

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  5. So this release says it will be ahead of schedule, but there are no timelines. When will a new timeline be proposed?

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    1. They estimated construction to start in two years and be completed by 2024

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  6. What is the new time frame for construction completion? From a colossal (embarrassing) 30+ year to ? The article doesn't suggest.

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  7. Not at all. Current c-train cars require a platform to board. Station floors are about a meter or so high from ground. The green line cars will be boarded from a side-walk type station.

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  8. I see far more need in the North Centre line since there are many feeder communities on the outskirts of Calgary that would use this line to downtown. Airdrie for example has a population of over 60,000 and growing by over 10% annually and a good portion of those people work in and commute to Calgary daily. Also, you are more likely to see higher ridership levels coming to and from the north.

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    1. Why should taxes collected from Caglary home owners benefit people in Airdrie? Are they giving their money to pay for a portion of this line?

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    2. In my mind, between the hours of 6 am and 9am, all traffic coming into Calgary should be charged an entry fee. If you enter Calgary during these hours, you pay a $10 entry fee, this will keep people from living in bedroom communities, paying lower taxes, and using our roads. After these hours, they can drive on OUR roads.

      If they don't like this, then we can show them what it is all about. One Saturday morning, we can get 50k cars from Calgary to show up in Cochrane, one Saturday in Airdrie, and one Saturday in Okotoks. Now if the City paid drivers to do this for a few months, just to drive home the point, I bet people wouldn't mind paying these fees as their towns would be rendered traffic nightmares.

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  9. I see what they did there. A local guy must be trying to score votes. ;)

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  10. Great project! I just hope that it would have waiting areas; closed with heather and insolated floors

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  11. I assume this means that the alignment South of 24th Ave N through downtown will be accelerated now? This part has always been a big mystery.

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  12. wow, that was one crappy and confusing animation...

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  13. Nice to see the city is again ignoring some of the most populated areas (i.e., Forest Lawn) for the wealthier areas.

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    1. To be fair, wealthier areas have people who have more time and energy to annoy the politicians, so their issues are addressed. Poor areas, the people are busy working and don't have time to complain. People that make decisions regarding infrastructure are engineers and architects and again most don't live in Forest Lawn. So your right, it is sad that the city ignores you, but how are you going to change it? Complaining on here won't help. You need to meet with you city councilor and bring the cities own public data showing that there is a need.

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  14. You could try an effort to extend a little bit the line to connect the international airport. Congratulations: world class city

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  15. Please try to connect the international airport. Just some km. When will this be complete?

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  16. This is great news....what a huge project, I watched the video of all the stations, a whole lot of work to be done.....and the decision on tunnel under or bridge over river will be huge!! I suspect bridge will win.....but time will tell!!

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  17. And it doesn't connect to the airport?? In all major and smart cities do. If we are already spending so much capital, it should be smart to connect it directly to the airport. I spend $100 in taxi every time I fly. It you Calgary to grow you need to think smarter in longer terms.

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  18. North central is the biggest community in Calgary. Deerfoot North is worst then the south Deerfoot leg these last few years. Bus route 301 and the number 3 north has the biggest rider ship. If politic doesn't get in the way the North leg would be an easy decision to be built 1st.

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    1. The Northern Communities are not as vocal or as organized as those in the South. The South leg will be built first and then, if the money hasn't been reallocated, the North leg might get a study or a bus-only corridor.

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  19. When will the airport finally (and logically) be connected to the airport?

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    1. The airport is already connected to the airport.

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  20. Will the LRT extend to skyview ranch ??? Or will there be any improvement in the transit to skyview?

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  21. Fomer mayor dave bronnconner said the trains running from somerset to tuscany have to be put under 8th avenue before the south east leg goes in

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    1. Hence the "Former" part.

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  22. This is great news! But what about the Heritage station TOD project? This area is getting to be a real eyesore with abandoned buildings like the YMCA, and large areas of land under utilized. When will we see some progress here?

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  23. I can't believe it will take NINE years to build such just a 50 km long single line. HOLY, I don't know whether I can live till the day of it's completion.

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    1. Considering that the city has been working on the same intersection (Metis and Country Hill Blvd) for over 3 years now and it STILL under construction, I think nine years to complete a 50 k stretch is quite an achievement.

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    2. Road construction baffles me. I've worked in highrise concrete and we can put up a forty story building with a four story underground parkade in a year but an overpass takes five times the money and three times as long.

      Sounds legit...

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